Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

Ulla Weigerstorfer, Miss Austria, Miss World 1987

I encourage young girls and boys to realize that the way they treat their bodies will have a big impact later in life. I know that teenagers consider themselves 'invincible', and I was that way too, of course. But it isn’t difficult to 'invest in your bones'. Don’t buy into the myth of starving yourself. Don’t be a couch potato. Eat wisely, get outside and have fun. Your body will thank you in a few years.

Martin Yan, Master Chef

I’m very interested in helping to fight osteoporosis because many people, including my mother, suffer from this terrible disease. Eating foods high in calcium, like bok choy, cheese, and broccoli, can help reduce the risk of developing this disease. Use the right ingredients and choose foods that are good for the bones, your body and soul. Bone Appétit!

Imelda Read, former member of the European Parliament and founding chair of the EP Osteoporosis Interest Group

Far too many Europeans at high risk of osteoporosis still suffer needlessly because they did not have timely diagnosis or preventive therapies.